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Isaac and some people from his church in Thailand

Matt recently visited Isaac to see first-hand how he is building a disciple-making ministry in Bangkok. What is it like to see discipleship happen in Thailand?

Meeting on the Degree programme, Matt Bodinham and Isaac Lasky became fast friends. Upon graduating in 2014, both Matt and Isaac began building disciple-making ministries, spread out across the globe.

Matt went back to his hometown to begin building a youth discipleship charity and Isaac moved to Thailand and began to serve with New Anglican Missionary Society. Here is Matt’s story of his visit.

“This past spring my wife, Amy, and I had the opportunity to go and stay with Isaac and his wife Pat. One of the things that I enjoyed the most about getting to see them, was the opportunities to see what life and ministry look like for them.

Isaac Lasky and Pat Lasky

“Isaac and Pat live in a Christian Student Centre, and run the local church that focuses on that group. As well as living amongst the students, Pat works at the coffee shop in the centre. So, within hours of landing in Bangkok, we were sat in a cafe being introduced to numerous Thai people that Pat and Isaac work with, and are discipling.

“We learnt that culturally, Thai people don’t really introduce each other, so Isaac filled us in on their names, where they’re from, what they’re studying, other things he knew about them, and most importantly, what they brought to the church. It was clear just from this that Isaac was very intentional at getting every member of the church to invest and help with the running; something that I believe is a key tenant of discipleship and faith.

Matt and Isaac on Palm Sunday

“On Palm Sunday, Isaac had asked if I would lead the sermon, and I was happy to do it (if not a little nervous at having to speak through a translator). When we got to Sunday morning, I was looking forward to standing up in front of people and sharing the message that I felt that God had given me. The reality was that I was in for a surprise, because by the time we got to the sermon, I was the last one to do something for the service.

“Isaac had invited a twelve-year-old (on the spot) to the welcome and connective parts of the service, and that was just the beginning. Whether it was leading the worship, preparing a meal for everyone afterward, doing
a dramatic re-telling of the Palm Sunday Story, every single person in the room led a part of the service- even Amy, who was asked to do the English half of the reading (again, on the spot)!

“It really made me think of my own church, and what our expectations of the congregation are: do we just ask the same people do jobs, or do we make it the role of the whole church to lead? This, I think, is a really key piece to discipleship that I see Isaac really model well, and it was such a blessing to be able to get to see and be a part of it.”

Isaac & Pat Lasky in the Village

We are kicking off our blog series ‘Understanding Gen Z’. You may be wondering where we got our info from? Or, you may be interested in learning more? Here is a list of our sources and recommended research to learn all things Gen Z.

This is our recommended reading on this topic. We always love to hear from you, so if this series sparks any questions, we would love to hear from you.

You can email me by visiting our Contact Us page.

If you would like to find out more about how we are equipping leaders you can visit The Degree, Learning Community and Gap Year pages. We are still taking applications too!

Our Fave Gen Z Reports and Podcasts

Youth For Christ: Rethinking Culture

You can read their Research Here

Youth For Christ: Digital Generation

You can read this Research Here

The Gen Z Podcast

This Cultural Moment

Books

Meet Generation Z: Understanding and Reaching the New Post-Christian World by James Emery White

You can buy it on Amazon here.

Everyday Church; Mission by Being Good Neighbours – by Tim Chester

You can buy it on Amazon here.

Missional Discipleship after Christendom – by Andy Hardy and Dan Yarnell

You can buy their book on Amazon here.

Generation Z: Their Voices, Their Lives – by Chloe Combi

You can buy it on Amazon here.

Journals

Doyle and Treacy

Doyle, L. and Treacy, M.P. and Sheridan, A. (2015). ‘Self-harm in young people: Prevalence,
associated factors, and help-seeking in school-going adolescents’, International Journal of
Mental Health Nursing, 24 (6), pp. 485-495.

You can view this journal via this link.

The Internet

Barna: Perceptions of Jesus, Christians and Evangelism in the UK

The Telegraph: Britain is no Longer a Christian Country

The Telegraph: Young People Head to Church

Christianity Today: Why is Gen Z More Open to Faith?

Comparably: Comparing Compensation and Culture of Millenials & Gen Z

Gizelle Abramovich: 15 Mind Blowing Stats about Generation Z

Premier Christianity: How Can Churches Attract Millenials and Gen Z?

Sharon Florentine: Everything You Need to Know about Gen Z

Staying true to their core values of diversity and tolerance, rather than question the cause and effect of practicing multiple sexualities and genders, Gen Z adopts a stance of complete acceptance.

Want to know where we got our sources or want to learn more about Gen Z? Read our Gen Z: Recommended Reading post

” In 3 or 4 years, there are going to be a whole lot more people who don’t think it’s necessary to figure out if you’re gay or straight. It’s like, just do your thing.”

Kristen Steward

Before turning to the topic of sexual fluidity, it’s worth looking at the impact that online pornography has had on Generation Z’s sexuality in general. According to James Emery White in his book ‘Meet Generation Z’, 70% of 18-34 year-olds regularly view porn online. Moreover, he mentions that the average age teens first watch porn is 11 years-old.

Statistics show that teens are starting to view porn at a younger age, but they also show that they are becoming increasingly addicted. Pornography seems to be taking over the lives of many young people; it has negative effects on how they relate to friends and family…. not to mention the opposite sex.

Jared’s Story

“I remember the first time I saw porn, I was probably about six. I went to a primary school which was attached to a high school. There were always older kids…

“I’d say about nine, a lot of the boys at school were either interested in seeing porn, had seen some or were watching it a bit. You’d have to be pretty clueless not to be aware of it…

“The first thing I did when I got my laptop for the first time – I got it about 3 months before my phone – was go up to my room and look for porn.”

“It was exciting, like a bit sort of dirty, but mostly exciting, secret.

“The thing I couldn’t believe was how much there was of it. It’s like the more you look the more you find, and you can literally find anything…

“At first, I’d only watch a bit and then I’d slam the laptop shut and feel all scared. But then it was obvious – nobody cared and there wasn’t going to be the porn police showing up to arrest you and tell your parents.

“So, I kept watching more and more…”

“Instead of hanging around my mates at lunch, I’ll go home and watch porn. I watch porn every night. Sometimes straight from school. I just lock the door and put headphones on.

“We went to Greece last summer and I was panicking I wouldn’t be able to access porn. But, luckily the hotel had WiFi and I could. I had to be a bit more careful as we were sharing this apartment… “

“Do I think this has changed the way I see girls? Yeah. Sort of. I haven’t had a girlfriend and it seems weird to think about the girls I know doing the stuff I watch.

“Like, I do think about them in those… like, the porn scenes sometimes, you can’t help it. But it’s really hard to imagine doing it in real life. I don’t know if real life will be as good as porn films.

“Why? Because some people say that girls are never as dirty in real life as they are in porn. And like, when you watch porn films you can sort of put yourself in the position of the man, and he’s always the boss.

“I don’t feel like that around girls in real life so I don’t think real-life sex can be as good. Also, no girls in school look like the girls in porn films which is okay. But, I love how girls look in porn.”

Jared, 16 Southampton. Estimated 60 hours per week on devices. (Combi, 2015, pp. 186-189)

The impact of pornography on teenagers is being explored in more depth through emerging research. Want more insight into the impact of porn on teens? Channel 4’s documentary, ‘Porn on the Brain’ is a great watch for more info.

Sexting and Pornographic Images

Unfortunately, viewing pornography is not the greatest danger facing Gen Z. Young people are increasingly becoming – willingly and unwillingly – the objects of pornographic images and videos. La Trobe University’s Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society found;

  • Nearly 3/4 of 15-18 year-olds have sexted.
  • Half of 15-18 year-olds have sent naked or semi-naked photos and videos of themselves
  • 84% have received sexually explicit messages by phone or email.

Sending these message and images has actually become a new form of courtship, says James Emery White. However, the physical damage and emotional damage from being an object of pornographic images/videos cannot be overstated. Especially when they are capable of being shared around friendship groups, entire schools and the virtual world!

Gen Z: Equality, Fluidity and Acceptance

Equality and Acceptance

Staying true to their core values of diversity and tolerance, rather than question the cause and effect of practicing multiple sexualities and genders, Gen Z adopts a stance of complete acceptance.

Gen Z are connected to many different people, cultures and value systems. This has contributed to Gen Z’s value of diversity, acceptance, tolerance and equality.

Among these cultures and subcultures, Gen Z have met people and have access to a variety of sexual practices and lifestyle choices. Potentially leading Gen Z to becoming more sexually fluid than other teenagers in the past.

Sexual and Gender Fluidity

James Emery White highlights a YouGov survey, carried out in the UK, which shows that;

“49% of young people, between the ages of 18-24, identified as something other than 100% heterosexual.”

James Emery White and YouGov Survey

These realities are not confined to sexual fluidity. Gen Z seems more than able to cope with a fluid sense of gender too. One of the major stories of Gen Z’s adolescence was watching Olympian, Bruce Jenner, transition to Caitlyn Jenner.

Today, most will have friends, or at least acquaintances, who are living out as a gender different from their birth. There is a real sense amongst this generation that;

“Sexuality should be set free from any and all restrictions and people should be allowed to follow their desires, moment by moment.”

Helena Horton, 2015

It is beyond the scope of this post to offer a depth of responses or applications. The purpose of this post is to help educate us on the perspective of Generation Z. One important conclusion is that it is very difficult for Generation Z to imagine that they can live a full and meaningful life without being sexually active.

Any discussion of a Biblical response must start with the questions of identity. If it is true that we are created by God, the reality is we are primarily spiritual – not sexual! We must help young people see that the Bible, and in particular the life of Christ, shows us that our primary satisfaction will come from our relationship with God and His people, not from our sexual expression.

In my post titled, Gen Z: What kind of Leader Will They Follow?, we discuss the type of leaders the Generation Z will respond to as we navigate these complex issues like sexuality.

It’s been said that Gen Z have endless amounts of information but virtually no mentors. So, what kind of leaders are they looking for?

Leaders Who Serve as Models

We’ve been looking at Gen Z: What Every Church Needs to Think About when trying to reach the younger generation. In this, my last post of the series, we reflect on where our lives cross with young people in Gen Z. Specifically, we ask, are we becoming leaders who Gen Z will respond to?

Historically, teachers, parents, and preachers could pass on information and knowledge to young people. However, we have found that Gen Z have endless amounts of information at their fingertips, without the help of intermediaries.

Young people will not wait to ask at youth group or Sunday services to ask about the Bible or Christian beliefs on lifestyle issues. Instead, most young people will go straight to Google or Youtube.

So, what is our role?

Youth For Christ, asked young people; “What are things that make someone trustworthy?”. An astonishing 57% of Generation Z answered, “Once they have proved themselves.”

This is the key to our primary function as missional youth leaders. If we desire to influence, we must impart true wisdom. Information we have learned, but not personally applied to our lives, will get lost like white noise.

Our job is to model. Our task is to one who can say, like the apostle Paul,

“Follow my example, as I follow the example of Christ.”

1 Corinthians 11:1

Leaders who Share their Lives

If we want to lead and influence, we must share our lives. And this cannot happen from a distance. Young people will not grow from us being on the stage or behind a pulpit.

We are called to teach and preach the Word, but it isn’t just for the purpose of relaying information. We now have access to the scriptures, in the West, in our pockets at anytime.

So, Gen Z’s questions are not primarily “What?”, but instead, “How?”. Like, “How do I apply these words to my life?”. In my experience, I see young people looking to me to answer the following questions:

Young People’s FAQ’s

  • What does it look like to be a Christian in everyday life?
  • What does it look like to pray?
  • What does it look like to be tempted and not give in?
  • What does it look like to mess up and have to ask for forgiveness?
  • What does it look like to resolve a conflict with friends?
  • What does it look like to sit down and have dinner with your family?
  • What does it look like to interact with the person behind the till?
  • What does it look like to be disappointed with God when our prayers aren’t answered?
  • What does it look like to cook a meal?
  • What does it look like to respond to someone who is opposed to Christians and Christianity?

Discipleship

We are youth leaders, we need to serve as role models and share our lives with our young people. This has an impact on how we choose to spend our time and how we view success.

It seems that Gen Z will not be reached in masse. Instead, ministry needs to be up close and personal. Gen Z do not need teachers as much as they need parents. They do not need preachers as much as they need pastors.

These truths may seem overwhelming to us as emerging, missional youth leaders. But feeling overwhelmed can make us ask important questions, such as;

Youth Leader FAQ’s

  • I cannot relationally lead everyone, so, who should I spend my time with?
  • I am only slightly older than the young people I am trying to lead and I haven’t had a lot of life experience yet. How do I model true wisdom?
  • I’m not sure I have ever had an older Christian model. How do I pass on something which I have never received?

These questions will hopefully drive us to realise, we cannot embark on this task of modelling and sharing life by ourselves. We learn to pour into a few young people who can in turn pour into their friends. We learn to identify and raise up a team of caring adults who can care for the few.

Caring Adults

When looking for caring adults who fit this description, there is good news! Gen Z is looking for good role models and wants to spend time with the older generations!

Premier Christianity say that Gen Z want to be included. They want to take part. They want to be mentored. Unlike Baby Boomers and Gen X who didn’t want anything to do with their elders. Gen Z want to be friends with their elders.

“They want to see that older people mean what they say about being a disciple of Jesus. They want to see what it looks like.”

Premier Christianity, 2019

We need to correct the common misconception amongst churchgoers that the best youth leaders are young. Instead, youth leaders need to be willing to open their lives to young people and serve as the kind of imperfect examples and role models which Gen Z are crying out for. 

We have a passion for seeing young people flourishing with God through discipleship. Click here for more discipleship resources and watch the video below to find out more about how we are equipping leaders through The Degree.

Want to know where we got our sources or want to learn more about Gen Z? Read our Gen Z: Recommended Reading post

Short attention spans and socially isolated. The good and bad about this internet-in-its-pocket generation.

The Smartphone

The smartphone is perhaps the most significant factor that defines the distinctive behaviours of Generation Z. Some people are beginning to label it the ‘internet-in-its-pocket generation’. In contrast to the previous generations who experienced the exciting emergence of the internet and the ability to access it anytime and anywhere, for Generation Z, the internet has always just ‘been there’.

In his book, ‘Meet Generation Z’, James Emery White highlights that teenagers spend nearly 9 hours a day absorbed by media. Sparks and Honey found 91% of Gen Z go to bed with their phones. Moreover, Giselle Abramovich found 79% of Gen Z showed symptoms of emotional distress when they aren’t able to have their personal electronic devices.

In my work with Reign Ministries equipping youth ministers our students laugh at Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs and add their own “basic human needs” to the bottom of my handouts.

The impact of having a ‘supercomputer’ in one’s pocket is far-reaching. It has changed the way young people learn, where they gain knowledge, how they work and play, how long they can focus, who their friends are, how they feel about others and how they feel about themselves.

Changes in Learning

Similar to the revolution set in motion by the Gutenberg’s printing press that paved the way for information to be distributed and accessed by the common person, mobile internet devices have made knowledge and information constantly and immediately accessible to all. This carries with it many obvious blessings.

The author of this session has appreciated the way his own children have benefited from this immediate and free access to the internet when they are struggling to understand their Maths homework. Rather than trying to find time with the teacher between classes or after school, they can simply type their question into YouTube and search through a variety of instructors until they find one who can explain mathematical concepts in a teaching style best suited to their style of learning.

And, if they didn’t understand everything clearly the first time through, they can simply pause, go back and re-watch it as many times as necessary. This way of learning has obvious advantages over what the traditional classroom can offer. This ability to access information has led to a very important dynamic that is true of Generation Z…

“…the ability to find whatever they’re after without the help of intermediaries – such as libraries, shops or teachers. This has made them more independent and self-directed than generations before them.”

James Emery White, Meet Generation Z

Young people no longer need to track down an expert or find a place that sells or stores books, journals or periodicals if they want to learn about a particular topic; all the information we need is available in the palm of our hands. This ability to access seemingly limitless streams of information does not always make true learning easier, however.

“Like no other generation before, Generation Z faces a widening chasm between wisdom and information. Quentin Schultze writes that the torrent of information now at our disposal is often little more than ‘endless volleys of nonsense, folly and rumour masquerading as knowledge, wisdom and even truth.”

James Emery White referencing Quentin
Schultze (2002)

“The new task of education is to help students evaluate information.”

Chuck Kelley (2011)

Shorter Attention Span

In addition to completely transforming the way Generation Z accesses information and learns, constant connectivity to the internet has had major effects on our ability to focus on a task.

According to the National Centre for Biotechnology Information, the average attention span has dropped from 12 seconds in 2000 to 8.25 seconds in 2015.

“…to put that in perspective, the average attention span of a goldfish is 9 seconds!”

James Emery White, Meet Generation Z

Internet Browsing Statistics (White)

Average length watched of single internet video: 2.7 mins

Percent of page views lasting less than 4 seconds: 17

Percent of page views lasting more than 10 minutes: 4

Words read on web pages with 11 words or less, as a percentage: 49

Percent of words read on an average (593 words) web page: 28

Combine these facts with previous statistics that showed Generation Z can multitask across 5 screens, it becomes clear that this generation prefers to give attention to several things at once rather than focus on one thing at a time.

However, while conventional wisdom holds that multitasking accomplishes more, many emerging studies show that we severely overestimate our ability to multi-task successfully. Constantly switching attention between tasks is affecting our ability to problem solve.

Watch this Ted Talk by Manoush Zomorodi about “How boredom can lead to our most brilliant ideas.

Relationships

Because of Generation Z’s ability to access vast amounts of information and endless amounts of entertainment anytime, anywhere, many are concluding that this generation is the most anti-social and lonely age group to date.

However, how accurate are these conclusions? What do young people themselves have to say about the ways they would like to relate to their peers?

To answer these questions, Youth for Christ asked young people how they most like to spend their time socializing. They found 32% preferred spending time with friends outside. Moreover, 31% preferred spending time with friends at home.

In contrast, 24% preferred to socialize on the internet. But just 6% liked to spend time with peers at an out-of-school club/activity/group. Unfortunately for youth leaders like us, only 2% preferred to spend time with peers at a youth club.

We will pick up on the statistics regarding attendance at youth clubs and outside of school activities in a later session. But despite what most may assume, young people still prefer face to face interactions with their peers over interactions via a screen.

In fact, Pew Research Centre found 85% of young people love to meet up with friends in person. Only 15% of young people prefer talking through Social Media.

Globally Connected

Although Gen Z prefers socializing with their friends in person, online interactions have expanded their relationship networks. Young people use their devices to watch video content created by people from around the world, to game with friends from around the world and to interact with people from around the world. All this on a variety of social media platforms.

“…26% of Gen Z would need to fly to meet most of their social network friends.”

Sparks and Honey, 2014

This means they have not merely studied facts about other countries and cultures in a classroom, but they actually have friends from other cultures. These global friends will all have varied – and often conflicting – value systems and ways of living. And, all of these different behaviors, values and lifestyle choices seem to ‘work’ for them.

When languages and oceans separate people groups, it’s easy to become ethnocentric. However, it is much more difficult to critique a person’s worldview when you have regular personal interactions and friendships. Therefore, Generation Z is characterized by a strong sense of acceptance and inclusion.

Employers are beginning to grow more aware of these core values and are conscious to create work environments which foster them. This is shown by research conducted by Door of Clubs. In a survey, 5000 students were asked their most important value of a company when entering the workforce. Most importantly, equality was the No.1 value.

“Diversity, inclusion and belonging should be core values of your organization and can
impact your ability to attract and retain an entire generation of talent, not just talent
from underrepresented groups”

Pranam Lipinski and Sharon Florentine

In my post titled Understanding Gen Z’s Sexual Fluidity, we unpack what these tightly held beliefs may mean for the church. Also, what this means for our efforts to share the truth claims of Christianity with Generation Z.

Generation Z hasn’t rejected God as previous generations may have done. They simply don’t ever think about him. What might that mean for your church?

Teenagers Past and Present

We can be fairly certain that adolescents, since the emerging youth culture in the 20th Century until the present, have felt anxious about their place in the world. Particularly entering adulthood!

In the distant past, children would have grown up to follow in their mother’s footsteps to raise a family or followed their father to the farm or the factory.

But adolescents from around the mid-century until today have a seemingly endless array of choices and opportunities at their feet to help script their own way of life. We explore this further in Year 3 of the Youth Ministry Module, as part of The Degree.

Different Generations, Similar Priorities

Youth For Christ recently found that Generation Z possesses many of the same priorities, worries and concerns that relatively recent teenage populations like Millenials and Gen X had. You can read my earlier post if you are unfamiliar with the difference between Millenials and Gen Z.

For example, when asked about their own lives and their top worries, 54% answered “School and Exams”, and 30% “What Other People Think of Me”.

When asked about their priorities, 82% said that “Making my family proud of me”, 64% answered “Becoming Successful”. These priorities wouldn’t be far off how young people from previous generations communicated about the things that were important to them.

So those in Generation Z do share several traits common to all adolescents in recent decades. But significant differences do exist and many of them have huge implications for the church. Specifically, Generation Z hasn’t rejected God, as previous generations may have done, they simply don’t ever think about him.

Generation Z is Post-Christian

Individuals who have grown up as part of Generation Z have little or no history with God, the church or the Christian faith. It is important to note that Generation Z have not so much rejected God as much as they just have never really ‘met’ Him in the first place.


“The 2015 British Election Study showed that those who claim to have no
religious affiliation or no religious faith has risen from 3% in 1963 to 44.7%
today. Among adults aged 25 and under, the number of ‘nones’ climbed to
nearly two-thirds.”

White, 2017

This does not mean they are not interested in spiritual things. It’s just that they are turning to places other than Christianity and the church to try to connect with the spiritual realm.

This presents several challenges to the church, as the ways it has sought to engage with young people in the past may no longer prove effective.

Challenges for Starting with Parents

Because Generation Z has grown up in a fully Post-Christian culture, they often aren’t raised by Christian parents. Therefore the church will find it difficult to engage with parents as a starting point for reaching significant numbers of young people.

And even those parents who have a Christian faith are increasingly feeling overwhelmed at the task of helping to shape their children’s worldviews and beliefs. In the ‘Passing on Faith’ research conducted by Olwyn Mark, only 40% of parents said they had had a conversation about faith with their children.

Furthermore, 34% said they believed social media and technology would make a bigger impact on their children’s beliefs than their own influence (Youth for Christ, 2016, pp. 40-41 citing Olwyn Mark’s Passing on Faith research).

Challenges for Gathering Young People

I recently attended the Youth Evangelism Conference and was struck by how often the topic regarding ‘the numbers of young people leaving the church’ was mentioned. Resources and workshops were on offer that could help youth leaders in their efforts to make faith more ‘sticky’ for young people.

While we do want to want to hang on to those young people who have grown up in our ranks, the statistics regarding Generation Z make it painfully clear, the overwhelming majority of young people are not in the church in the first place.

As Tim Chester and Steve Timmis reminded us in their book Everyday Church, Mission by Being Good Neighbours:

“70% of the UK population have no intention of ever attending a church service. That means new styles of worship will not reach them. Fresh expressions of church will not reach them. Alpha and Christianity Explored courses will not reach them. Guest services will not reach them. Churches meeting in pubs will not reach them. Toddler churches meeting at the end of the school day will not reach them.

“The vast majority of un-churched and de-churched people would not turn to the church, even if faced with difficult personal circumstances or in the event of national tragedies. It is not a question of ‘improving the product’ of church meetings and evangelistic events. It means reaching people apart from meetings and events”

Young people are not coming to church services on a Sunday. And recent research amongst Generation Z also reveals they are much less likely to access youth clubs or drop-in sessions. This, coupled with the reality that young people can interact socially without leaving the comforts of their own bedrooms, does present challenges to the mission-shaped church who desires to gather young people.

Challenges in Communication

Despite the reality that fewer people are interested in coming to the church when it is gathered, especially on a Sunday morning, the church continues to place a high priority on its weekend services.

Furthermore, most churches seem to continue to place a high emphasis during these services on a spoken message that is delivered primarily as a one-way transmission.

However, due to the increase in the ability to access the internet from mobile devices – the average attention span of young people is significantly decreasing (see my post titled, Gen Z: The Internet in It’s Pocket Generation).

According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, attention spans have dropped from 12 seconds in 2000 to just 8.25 seconds in 2015.

Adapting our Communications

The church has been bound by Jesus and by the early apostles to preach and teach the Word. We do not have a choice on whether or not to do this. But the church does have a choice regarding how it is done. What impact should decreasing attention spans have on how the church communicates its message in this culture?

Much more reflection will need to take place by church leaders and youth leaders working with Generation Z in order to be more effective in how we communicate. But James Emery White offers an initial and very helpful take:

“(Generation Z) communicates in bite sizes…Bottom line? Whatever it is we
are attempting to convey, much less explain, will need to be communicated more frequently in shorter bursts of ‘snackable content”

James Emery White, Meet Generation Z

Reason for Hope

The reality that Generation Z has grown up with little or no awareness of God, coupled with the challenges of attracting young people to church outreaches or programmes, may cause today’s youth leaders to feel overwhelmed and want to give up before they even start. But the news is not all bad.

Experts who have been studying Generation Z and church leaders who have been working with them, sense a growing curiosity amongst this age group. Like all good ‘postmoderns’, Generation Z appears sceptical of organised religion, but they are not anti-God or anti-Jesus.

While the previous generation has essentially been ‘inoculated against faith’ by the adults who raised them, it’s because of this that Generation Z is now curious. Gen Z has virtually no awareness of the Christian faith, which causes them to be open to exploring it when presented with the opportunity.

In the following post, we explore the topic of What kind of leaders will Gen Z respond to?

Other posts by Darin on the topic of Gen Z include How to tell a Millennial from a Gen Z, Gen Z: Understanding Gen Z’s Sexual Fluidity, and Gen Z: Understanding the Internet-in-it’s-Pocket Generation.

Want to know where we got our sources about Gen Z? Read our Gen Z: Recommended Reading post

Sometimes it can feel like the youth and the church are disconnected from each other. Here are 5 simple ways to help your youth and the church develop a relationship and feel more connected.

Our students, friends and team share some tips and tricks to help the church and youth feel more connected to each other (they may also help to get in more volunteers!)

Prayer can not only help grow our faith as it encourages us to be in conversation with God and seek His help, but it also helps us to think about what we pray.

By encouraging the church or leadership team to pray for specific things within your young people’s lives and praying with the youth for other aspects of the church, helps us to think of eachother and feel more connected.

Because prayer invites testimony, praying for each other helps the church feel connected and invites spiritual and numerical growth to happen.

It may require us to keep updated in what is going on across all congregations, teams and individual people within the church but it will also help the youth and members of the church to have something to talk about.

We believe discipleship and growing youth ministry is all about being relational, that it is more than just a programme.

Youth ministry thrives for relationships helping them with their spiritual adventure. Help the church to see that youth ministry isn’t just a programme but a place to see the youth’s relationship with Jesus grow by being relational and working as a community!

We are near enough born for relationships and connecting with others. Christian author, Stasi Eldredge, says;

Part of discipleship is being overseen by a spiritual parent. One of the best ways to see youth and church members disciple others is by seeing how healthy discipleship works from your example.

Encourage your team to spark conversation with the youth and be real, help show the church the youth are wanting a relationship with God and connection with the community and no one is too old for getting down with the youth!

Inviting people in to talk to the youth about their testimony or have a go at serving on the youth team is a great way to help the youth get to know people in the church and know who they are.

Often, I felt the youth got a bit bored with my voice and having someone fresh to talk to help inspire them. They may feel like someone else in the church inspires them with their faith more or their story may resonate.

When someone comes to faith often they feel motivated to serve and help others, sometimes serving helps us to come to faith because we see generosity, love and relationship. The Bible inspires us to serve, and joy can come to us through helping.

Asking the youth to help serve on a team will not only make the teams super grateful but will help the youth to build relationships with people in the church and with God. Working together can be fun, starts a conversation and helps us to feel part of something.

It also helps the youth to see the generosity of the volunteers helping and maybe help them to respect you. Serving on a team can be so life-giving and gives all the feel-good vibes!

Many studies have found having a mentor helps people massively in all aspects of life, especially teenagers. According to research from 2008, having a healthy mentor-style relationship during teenage years helps to reduce the likelihood of substance abuse, promotes better mental health, increases confidence, betters academic performance and improves family relationships. This relationship helps youth to feel listened to, supported and increases personal relationships.

So many of our students are inspired by people in the church who mentored them or invested time into their spiritual journey. This helps to ignite a passion to do the same.

Alex, who is currently studying on the Degree says; “Because people discipled me and invested into my life, I want to do the same for others. I want to be the person who invests into others and helps the to grow in their relationship with God.”

If you feel they are able, it may be good for the youth to mentor someone else. Maybe there is a younger person in the youth who would benefit with a mentor in your youth group.

Action!

Finding a Mentor – Ask the church if there is anybody who would like to be a mentor for one of the young people and to sign up in whichever way is easiest for your context. Then you may be able to see people who would suit mentoring a specific young person in the group.

Sam, Friend of Reign

We hope this gave you some inspiration! For more resources, stories and information check out our blog and website

*With all these suggestions make sure you keep on track with safeguarding and DBS. Speak to a church leader if you need any help with this. Have fun!

 

In this, our third and final podcast, we talk with Reign Ministries Director, Kyle McKinnon and youth practitioners Brad Laing, Meghan Murphy and Sam Williams, as well as researcher Phoebe Thompson about the implications of the Losing Heart report for youth ministry training organisations.

If you have a heart to change the trend in your local context and could use support and training, contact us to see how we could help prepare you to develop an effective, disciple-making ministry in your church or youth project.

 

Today’s podcast is fifteen minutes long.

 

The team at Youthscape Centre for Research surveyed over 2000 churches regarding their youth and children’s work.  It’s key three findings are that:

  1. Churches, especially smaller ones, do more children’s work than youth work.
  2. Churches are failing to talk about the topics young people want to discuss.
  3. Churches know that they are struggling with their children’s and youth work but don’t know how to fix it.

The Losing Heart report suggested a crisis of confidence that churches have in their ability to reach young people.

Yesterday we began our podcast series with researcher, Phoebe Thompson sharing a summary of the Losing Heart report.  If you missed yesterday’s introduction podcast, you can listen to here.

In todays podcast we discus the report with a team of youth ministers.  We discuss how the church can better prepare itself to receive youth, and the role of the volunteer in the future of youth ministry.  Today’s podcast is 15 minutes long.

 

 

In December 2016 a sobering report was released by Youthscape Centre for Research.  It highlighted the crisis of confidence that churches are having about their ability to engage young people.

Many simply can’t seem to provide any youth work or don’t have any young people left to work with, and it’s hard to know what comes first: young people leaving the church, or a lack of youth provision. For many of these churches, the workers are few and they are losing heart and confidence.

Losing Heart Report, Page 8

Since our heartbeat at Reign Ministries is to train youth ministers and volunteers and spark movements of discipleship among young people we thought it imperative to sit down with researcher Phoebe Thompson and discuss her findings.  We’ve broken our podcast into three parts which we will run over the next three days.

If you would like to read the research for yourself you can download it at:  https://www.youthscape.co.uk/research/publications/losing-heart

Today’s podcast is just over eight minutes long.